Things to See and Do on Your Own

These are suggestions for things to do on your own and are not organized events.

Downtown Dallas!

Concerts one night, off-Broadway productions the next. Modern art next to a homesteader’s cabin. Dallas is a city of beautiful contrasts, and if there is one thing you can count on, it’s that new experiences are always just around the corner. So take a stroll through the following suggested attractions, and discover something new each time!


Just click on the following attractions to go directly to their web-sites!

Always remember to consult The Sheraton Dallas’ Concierge Team for many more unique attractions, shopping, and local life experiences!


Dallas Museum of Art
1717 N Harwood @ Ross Avenue & Flora St.
214-922-1200

Founded in 1903, the museum is one of the oldest art museums in the country. For over 100 years the museum has displayed permanent and visiting art collections. Each Thursday evening the museum is open to the public free of charge. From 6:00-8:00pm, the museum features live Jazz on the Atrium. Hours: Tue & Wed 11am–5pm; Thu 11am–9pm; Fri-Sun 11am–5pm; Closed Mondays, New Year’s Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas; $10

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the hotel onto Olive St. Turn left at Ross Ave. The Dallas Museum of Art will be two blocks ahead on the right.

Nasher Sculpture Center
2001 Flora St. & Ross Avenue
214-242-5100

A collection of indoor and outdoor sculptures created by well-known, world-class artists. Many of the art pieces on display are a part of the permanent collection of Mr. Raymond Nasher, a local developer. The Nasher Collection started more than fifty years ago (1950) when Raymond and Patsy traveled to Mexico. They became interested in pre-Columbian art and bought the first works in what would become a sizable collection of objects from ancient Latin America. In the mid-1960s, the Nashers made their first significant purchases of modern sculpture. During the 1980s, the Collection grew at an accelerated pace. Some of their collection still stands at North Park Center Mall, a Nasher development. $10, $7 seniors 65+, $5 students with ID, free for kids under 12. Hours: Tues & Wed, 11am-5pm; Thu, 11am-9pm; Fri & Sat, 11am-5pm

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the hotel onto Olive. Turn left at Flora and the Nasher Sculpture Center will be on your left.

The Crow Collection of Asian Art
2010 Flora St. @ Ross
214-979-6430

The indoor and outdoor Asian art from the Trammel & Margaret Crow Collection is located in The Trammel Crow Building. Tue-Wed 10 am-5 pm; Thu 10 am-9 pm; Fri-Sun 10 am-5 pm; Closed Jan 1, July 4, Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. FREE.

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the hotel onto Olive St. Turn left at Ross Ave. One block ahead the Crow Collection of Asian Art will be on your right at Flora St.

The Belo Mansion & Pavilion (est. late 1800)
2101 Ross Ave @ Pearls St.
214-220-0239

Built in the neo-classical revival style, the Belo Mansion was built in the late 1800's by Colonel Alfred Horatio Belo, who founded the Dallas Morning News. Colonel Alfred Horatio Belo was a civil war hero who became one of the leading figures in Dallas development. He was born in Salem, North Carolina, in 1839. FREE, but touring is only available when functions are not being held.

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the hotel onto Olive St. Turn right at Ross Ave. and the Belo Mansion and Pavilion will be on the right.

Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center
2301 Flora
214-670-3600

The crown jewel of Dallas' musical venues opened in 1989. I.M. Pei designed it, with acoustics by Russell Johnson. A striking architectural monument, it is often cited by visiting artists as one of the most acoustically perfect halls of its kind in America. The focus of attention in the 2,062-seat auditorium is the Lay Family Organ, a huge instrument custom-made by the C.B. Fisk Co. of Massachusetts.

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the hotel onto Olive St. Turn left at Flora St, The Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center is one block ahead on the left at Flora St.

Cathedral Santuario de Guadalupe (Catholic Church) (est. 1900)
2201 Ross @ Pearl
214-871-1362

This Neo-Gothic Cathedral was constructed out of red brick and limestone trim and base, giving it Romanesque Revival characteristics. The cathedral features many beautiful stained glass windows and a wonderfully preserved interior. When the cathedral was constructed, it stood in the middle of a thriving residential community. Now the cathedral is situated on the edge of the Dallas Arts District and is surrounded by new office development.
MASS TIMES:
      English: Mon-Fri 12noon; Sat 5:30pm; Sun 9am & 12noon
      Spanish: Mon-Fri 7pm; Sat 7:30pm; Sun 7:30am, 10:30am, 1:30pm, and 3pm

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the hotel onto Olive. Turn right at Ross Ave. The Cathedral Santuario de Guadalupe will be on the left just past Pearl St.

Dallas World Aquarium
1801 S. Griffin St. @ Ross
214-720-2224

Features a 85,000-gallon aquarium, a walk through 22,000-gallon (83,280 l) tunnel with a panoramic view of reef life and the Orinoco -- Secrets of the River, an exhibit that represents the relatively unknown South American Orinoco River basin and an eight-story immersion exhibit where visitors move from the waters of the Yucatan's gulf coast to the highland Rainforest. Daily 10 am-5 pm; Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the hotel onto Olive. Turn left at Ross Ave. Six blocks down turn right onto Laws St. The Dallas World Aquarium is one block ahead on the left.

Neiman Marcus Department Store (est 1914)
One Marcus Square (Main @ Ervay @ Commerce)
214-741-6911

This is the flagship location for the renowned department store. The structure has been expanded both horizontally and vertically many times. The original 4-story sits on the southwest corner of Main and Ervay. It was expanded with a 4-story addition to the south, extending the full block along Ervay. The next addition, matching the style of the first two phases, placed 2 floors on top of the buildings. If you look carefully, you can see this addition is slightly less detailed. Then another floor was added in a later expansion that was similar to the original, but even less detailed than the previous one. In the 1940's, Neiman Marcus expanded horizontally to the west. This addition effectively doubled the size of the store, but did not match the building's architectural style. The last major addition put two floors on top of all of the buildings, giving the department store a total height of 9 stories. This addition looked slightly different than the previous 1940's addition, but was similar in style. The part that was built over the eastern half of the building only made a slight gesture to the ornamented lower floors with a cornice, but did not attempt to replicate the window pattern or the ornamental stone work. Mon-Wed 10 am-6 pm; Thu 10 am-8 pm; Fri-Sat 10 am-6 pm

Direction : Turn left from the front driveway of the hotel onto Olive. Turn right on Live Oak St. Turn right on Ervay S. for two blocks. Neiman Marcus will be one block ahead on the right.

Fountain Place (est. 1986)
1445 Ross @ Field
214-855-7766

This unique 720-foot tall skyscraper with 62 stories was designed by I.M. Pei & Partners, who also designed One Dallas Center, Energy Plaza, the Dallas City Hall, and the Morton Meyerson Symphony Center. Once part of a three-building development, Fountain Place was to include a twin tower and a hotel all placed in a beautiful water park featuring many fountains. The second tower and the hotel were never constructed, but the fountains were completed. The skyscraper is clad in green glass and is sculpted into a prism. One of the unique features is that it looks completely different as you view it from various locations in Downtown. Fountain Place is the 5th tallest skyscraper in Dallas.

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the hotel. Turn left onto Ross Ave. The Fountain Place is five blocks ahead on the right. You can also use the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART). Please see concierge for details.

The West End Historic District
Market St. between Pacific and McKinney Ave.
214-741-7185

Dallas’ true historical district sets the stage for the story of Dallas when it was first settled in the mid-1800’s. Since then, chapters continue to unfold daily along its picturesque streets and buildings. Nestled in this historic area are more than 25 restaurants, bars, souvenir shops, and entertainment venues.

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the hotel onto Olive. Turn left onto Ross Ave. Market St. and The West End Historic District will be eight blocks ahead. You can also use the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART). Please see concierge for details.

The Sixth Floor Museum (est. 1883)
Dealey Plaza 411 Elm at Houston St.
214-747-6660

This museum is dedicated to the life, times, death, and legacy of the late President John F. Kennedy (JFK). Located in the former Texas School Book Depository, it displays over 400 photographs, artifacts, and videos. The building was originally constructed as the Southern Rock Island Plow Company. In 1901, struck by lightning, the five-story building nearly burned to the ground. It was rebuilt later that year, and expanded to seven stories. In 1963, the building housed the Texas School Book Depository. It is said, but not confirmed, that Lee Harvey Oswald fired the shots that killed President Kennedy from a 6th floor window. Dallas County now occupies the first five floors with administrative offices and the building is now called the Dallas County Administration Building. Hours: Daily 9am-6pm; Adults $13.50; US Seniors (ages 65+) $12.50; US Youth (ages 6-18) $12.50: add $3.50 for audio guide: US Children (ages 0-5) Free or $3.50 with audio guide.

Direction : Turn left from the front driveway of the hotel onto Olive. Turn right on Live Oak. Ten blocks ahead turn right onto Houston St. The Sixth Floor Museum and Dealey Plaza will be one block ahead on the left. You can also use the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART). Please see concierge for details.

Dealey Plaza, (Open 24 hrs.)
Houston St. between Elm St. and Commerce St.

On November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated as his motorcade was passing through Dealey Plaza. The Plaza will forever be linked with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, who was traveling toward and through its triple underpass when the assassination occurred. The infamous grassy knolls are located on each side on Commerce Street near the triple overpass.

Direction : Turn left from the front driveway of the hotel onto Olive. Turn right on Live Oak. Ten blocks ahead turn right onto Houston St. The Sixth Floor Museum and Dealey Plaza will be one block ahead on the left. You can also use the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART). Please see concierge for details.

John Fitzgerald Kennedy Memorial, (Open 24 hrs.)
Commerce Street between Houston St. & Market St.

New York architect and Kennedy family friend, Phillip Johnson, designed this 50-foot square, open-roofed, concrete cenotaph, or empty tomb. It is a lasting memorial to John F. Kennedy.

Direction : Turn left from the front driveway of the hotel onto Olive. Turn right on Live Oak. Ten blocks ahead turn right onto Houston St. The JFK memorial will be ahead on the left. You can also use the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART). Please see concierge for details.

“Old Red” Museum (est. 1891)
100 South Houston St.
214-745-1100

Formerly the Dallas County Courthouse. Construction originally began in March of 1890. The 6th building (and the 5th county courthouse) to occupy the site, Old Red was designed in the Richardson Romanesque style by M.A. Orlopp. It was originally crowned with a clock tower that was removed in 1919 when prevailing winds threatened its stability. Restoration of the building and re-establishment of the Clock Tower were completed in the spring of 2007. Mon-Sat 9am-5pm; Sun 12pm-5pm; $8 per person; Senior Citizens (over 65) $6 per person; Children (under 16) $5; Groups of 20 or more $5 per person.

Direction : Turn left from the front driveway of the hotel onto Olive. Turn right on Live Oak. Ten blocks ahead turn right onto Houston St. The Sixth Floor Museum and Dealey Plaza will be one block ahead on the left. You can also use the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART). Please see concierge for details.

Dallas Holocaust Museum
211 N. Record St, Suite 100
214-741-7500

The museum is dedicated to reducing prejudices by teaching about the Holocaust. Mon-Fri 10 am-5 pm; Sat-Sun, 11am-5 pm; Adults -- $6 Students -- $4 Seniors (over 55) -- $4 Active Military --$4 Groups of 15 or more-- $4 per person.

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the Fairmont Dallas onto Akard. Turn right onto Ross Ave. Five blocks ahead turn left onto Record St. The Dallas Holocaust Museum will be two blocks ahead on the left at Elm St.

Union Station (est. 1914)
401 Houston St. between Reunion Blvd West & East
214-746-6603

Designed by Jarvis Hunt in the Beaux Art style, this restored 1914-era railroad terminal facility is connected to the Hyatt Regency Dallas via an underground concourse. Long the transportation hub for Dallas, now its 1st level is dedicated to AMTRAK and the 2nd level provides conference and banquet facilities.

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the Fairmont Dallas onto Akard. Turn right onto Ross Ave. Six blocks ahead turn left onto Houston St.. Six blocks ahead the Union Station entrance will be on the right.

Reunion Tower @ the Hyatt Regency Dallas, (est. 1978)
300 Reunion Blvd
214-712-7040

This 50-story Tower and the Hyatt Regency Dallas Hotel were designed by Welton Beckett & Associates of Los Angeles, California. The Tower provides the best panoramic views (40 miles) of the Metroplex from its three upper levels. The lowest level is a public Observation Deck, the mid-level is a revolving Restaurant and the top level is a revolving Cocktail Lounge. The Tower is the 15th tallest building in Dallas. The entire hotel is covered with reflective glass. The focal point of the hotel itself is an interior 18-story atrium. The Hotel is the 34th tallest building in Dallas.

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the Fairmont Dallas onto Akard.. Turn right onto Ross Ave. Six blocks ahead turn left onto Houston St. Seven blocks ahead turn right onto Reunion Blvd.. Reunion Tower will be one block ahead on the left.

Pioneer Plaza, (Open daily, 24 hours)
Griffin St. @ Young St.

The larger-than-life longhorn Steer and (3) Cowboys on horseback by Robert Summers is the largest bronze sculpture of its kind in the World. It depicts the thundering action of an old-fashioned cattle drive.

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the Fairmont Dallas onto Akard. Turn right onto Ross Ave. Two blocks ahead turn left onto Griffin St. Pioneer Plaza will be eight blocks ahead at Young St. in front of the Dallas Convention Center.

Dallas Convention Center
650 S. Griffin Street
214-939-2700

One of the largest convention centers in the nation, totaling (1) one million square feet.

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the Fairmont Dallas onto Akard. Turn right onto Ross Ave. Two blocks ahead turn left onto Griffin St..

Thanksgiving Square
1627 Pacific Ave
214-969-1977

The square (totaling 3.5-acres) is set amid soaring skyscrapers, a peaceful courtyard, fountains, and gardens that provide a serene setting for personal reflection. It features a spiral-shaped chapel designed by Philip Johnson with stained glass by Gabriel Loire and honors the idea of gratitude in all world religions. The grounds were consecrated, Thanksgiving Day, 1976, and fully opened in 1977. The Center is a worldwide resource in the heart of Dallas that attracts visitors from around the world. Mon-Fri 9 am-5 pm; Sat-Sun and holidays 1-5 pm; (Site open 24 hrs)

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the Fairmont Dallas onto Akard. Four blocks ahead on Akard Thanksgiving Square will be on your left when you reach Pacific Ave.

Renaissance Tower (Est. 1974; re-glazed 1986)
1201 Elm Street

Designed by HOK of Dallas this distinctive building was originally the simplest of forms, a 56 story gold glass box that was 710 feet high. The building features cross bracing in the form of two large "X" patterns on each façade. At night the building is illuminated with a double "X" pattern on each facade and lights inside each of the five diamonds at the top of the towers. When the building was originally constructed, these structural elements were not expressed on the exterior. In 1986, the building underwent a major renovation that remodeled all of the buildings’ public areas and made significant exterior changes to the building. In the public plaza on the west side of the building and over the underground shopping areas, a large glass triangular Louvre-like (Paris, France) pyramid entry was constructed. All of the silver glazing was removed and was replaced by a glass design that featured different colors of glass. The height of the tallest tower is 176 feet above the roof. If the penthouse and the decorative towers are included, the skyscraper is 886 feet tall and is the 2nd tallest building in Dallas.

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the Fairmont Dallas onto Akard. Turn right onto Ross Ave. Two blocks ahead turn left onto Griffin St. Renaissance Tower will be on the right four blocks ahead at Elm St.

Majestic Theater (est. 1913)
1925 Elm Street
214-880-0137

The Majestic was originally constructed as the flagship facility for the Interstate Theater Chain. When it first opened, it was a vaudeville house that also aired movies. In 1932, it switched entirely to motion pictures. The movie house closed in 1973 and was given to the City of Dallas in 1976. The architectural style of the building is Renaissance Revival and it has been wonderfully restored. The restoration took place in 1983. In the 1920's and 1930's, Elm Street was known as theater row, with many movie theaters lining the street. The Majestic is the only one of these structures that remains today. A more recent addition to the building is a neon sign that gives the building a sense of place. The new sign is a recreation of an older one that was once on the façade of the building.

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the Fairmont Dallas onto Akard. One block ahead turn left onto San Jacinto. One block ahead turn right onto St. Paul. Dallas Heritage Village will be fourteen blocks ahead on the left immediately after crossing Interstate 30.

Dallas Heritage Village (formerly, Old City Park)
1515 South Harwood @ Gano St.
214-421-5141

Dallas Heritage Village is a living museum depicting life in Dallas from 1840-1910. Dallas' oldest park is a 13-acre accredited history museum. The grounds showcase 38 buildings which include the antebellum Millermore & other Victorian-era homes, log cabins, a Victorian Main Street, a railroad complex, an 1861 working farmstead with livestock, a 19th century church, and a school house all nestled among beautifully landscaped gardens. These historic structures also include a working print shop, general store, and blacksmith shop. Volunteers demonstrate smithing, weaving, cooking and other historic crafts. First-person interpreters dressed in clothing of the time period populate a select number of buildings and visitors may meet Mrs. Kennedy, lady of the 1861 farm house; Mrs. Blum, lady of the 1901 Orthodox Jewish Blum household, Potter Sims, Blacksmith Erastus Rausch, and more. (Tue-Sat 11am-3pm & Sun 12Noon – 4pm)

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the Fairmont Dallas onto Akard. Turn right onto Ross Ave. Two blocks ahead turn left onto Griffin St..

Dallas Farmers Market
1010 Pearl Street
214-939-2808

Area farmers sell their Texas-grown fruits and vegetables, plus you'll find other vendors selling produce from all over this region of the country. Bring cash – and an appetite. Most sellers are more than willing to tempt you with free samples. Open Daily 7am—6pm

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the Fairmont Dallas onto Akard. One block ahead turn left onto San Jacinto. Two blocks ahead turn right onto Harwood. Farmers Market will be twelve blocks ahead on the left at the corner of Taylor St.

Dallas Central Public Library
1515 Young St.
214-670-1400

J. Erik Jonsson: the namesake of Dallas' Central Public Library, was a Texas Instruments honcho, and he shared his name with such Nordic top guns as explorers Erik the Red and his son, Leif Eriksson, both big in discovery circles. The library also has a copy, printed on July 4, 1776, of the Declaration of Independence. View it in the Declaration of Independence Room on the seventh floor. Mon-Thu 9 am-9 pm; Fri-Sat 9 am-5 pm; Sun 1 pm-5 pm

Direction : Turn right from the front driveway of the Fairmont Dallas onto Akard. Turn right at first traffic light onto Ross Ave. One block down turn left onto Field St. Twelve blocks ahead turn left onto Young St. The Dallas Central Public Library will be two blocks ahead on the left at the corner of Ervay St.